serial twitter account deleter. ringleader, apparently.
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Facebook hackers stole locations and other private data for millions of users

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A Facebook logo and a phone running Facebook.

Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | NurPhoto )

The attackers who carried out the mass hack that Facebook disclosed two weeks ago obtained user account data belonging to as many as 30 million users, the social network said on Friday. Some of that data—including phone numbers, email addresses, birth dates, searches, location check-ins, and the types of devices used to access the site—came from private accounts or was supposed to be restricted only to friends.

The revelation is the latest black eye for Facebook as it tries to recover from the scandal that came to light earlier this year in which Cambridge Analytica funneled highly personal details of more than 80 million users to an organization supporting then-presidential candidate Donald Trump. When Facebook disclosed the latest breach two weeks ago, CEO Mark Zuckerberg said he didn’t know if it allowed attackers to steal users’ private data. Friday’s update made clear that it did, although the 30 million people affected was less than the 50 million estimate previously given. Readers can check this link to see what, if any, data was obtained by the attackers.

On a conference call with reporters, Vice President of Product Management Guy Rosen said that at the request of the FBI, which is investigating the hack, Facebook isn’t providing any information about who the attackers are or their motivations or intentions. That means that for now, affected users should be extra vigilant when reading emails, taking calls, and receiving other types of communications. The ability to know the search queries, location check-ins, phone numbers, email addresses, and other personal details of so many people gives the attackers the ability to send highly customized emails, texts, and voice calls that may try to trick people into turning over money, passwords, or other high-value information.

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dnorman
4 days ago
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Delete your Facebook Account: Oct. 12 2018 Edition.
Calgary
dreadhead
3 days ago
I would love to but at least in my circle of friends it remains a core tool for event/trip planning. I have made an effort to limit my usage as much as possible but I wish we could just go back to using email.
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Google+ exposed non-public data for 500k users, then kept it quiet

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Article intro image

Enlarge (credit: Ade Oshineye / Flickr)

Google exposed the private details of almost 500,000 Google+ users and then opted not to report the lapse, in part out of concern disclosure would trigger regulatory scrutiny and reputational damage, The Wall Street Journal reported Monday, citing people briefed on the matter and documents that discussed it. Shortly after the article was published, Google said it would close the Google+ social networking service to consumers.

The exposure was the result of a flaw in programming interfaces Google made available to developers of applications that interacted with users’ Google+ profiles, Google officials said in a post published after the WSJ report. From 2015 to March 2018, the APIs made it possible for developers to view profile information not marked as public, including full names, email addresses, birth dates, gender, profile photos, places lived, occupation, and relationship status. Data exposed didn’t include Google+ posts, messages, Google account data, phone numbers, or G Suite content. Some of the users affected included paying G Suite users.

Google Chief Executive Sundar Pichai knew of the glitch and the decision not to publicly disclose it, the WSJ reported. Based on a two-week test designed to measure the impact of the API bugs before they were fixed, Google analysts believe that data for 496,951 users was improperly exposed. According to the report:

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dnorman
8 days ago
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Jesus Christ. Can we start regulating these bastards yet? Time for Baby Googles?
Calgary
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Doug Ford joins Jason Kenney for anti-carbon tax rally in Calgary

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Jason Kenney, Doug Ford collage

Both Doug Ford and UCP Leader Jason Kenney have been vocal opponents of the federal government's plan to impose a price on carbon.

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dnorman
11 days ago
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Jesus Christ. What a couple of idiots. Yes, a carbon tax will make things more expensive. That's literally what it's designed to do, to nudge us away from carbon-based fuels.
Calgary
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Could border agents trick you into unlocking your Face ID-enabled iPhone?

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Article intro image

Enlarge / Phil Schiller, senior vice president of worldwide marketing at Apple Inc., speaks about Face ID for the iPhone X during an event at the Steve Jobs Theater in Cupertino, California, on Sept. 12, 2017. (credit: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Apple’s Touch ID is already on its way out. Just five years ago, iPhones began getting the famed fingerprint scanner that makes unlocking your phone dozens of times a day even easier.

But all of the new iPhones released this year—iPhone XS, iPhone XS Max, and iPhone XR—only have Face ID. They do not have Touch ID.

Back in 2013, some smart privacy-minded lawyers (notably Marcia Hofmann) began pointing out that a seemingly small change in technology may have a notable impact on the legal landscape.

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dnorman
15 days ago
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anyone traveling to the US needs to temporarily disable FaceID (and TouchID). Encrypt the phone. Set it to delete on repeated attempts to brute-force the PIN. Oh, great. Now I'm probably on a List™ for saying this out loud.
Calgary
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Lakritz doubles down in response to critics of her Kavanaugh-defending column

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Naomi Lakritz

Calgary Herald columnist Naomi Lakritz is firing back at a chorus of critics to her column this week that defended U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, who is accused of sexual assault.

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dnorman
18 days ago
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He’s not charged with anything. The incident is relevant because he’s about to be handed a lifelong tenure position in the highest court in the US, with implications that will last for generations. What he did in high school is relevant because it’s still in there somewhere.
Calgary
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dnorman
25 days ago
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there is only one date format. YYYY-MM-DD. It's clear. It's sortable.
Calgary
tingham
25 days ago
To "T" or not to "T" that is the question.
dnorman
25 days ago
"T" is relative.
tscheld
23 days ago
Pharma does it best: ddmmmyy 22Sep18
ChrisDL
22 days ago
i'm a software engineer, and YYYY-MM-DD is, in fact, the correct answer.
dreadhead
25 days ago
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Vancouver Island, Canada
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